Practice ap world essays

Organize with strength in mind : When outlining the respective topics you will be discussing, start from the topic you know second best, then the topic you know least, before ending with your strongest topic area. In other words, make your roadmap so that you leave your reader with the feeling that you have a strong understanding of the question being asked. This means that when you are performing your analysis on the AP World History test , you want to make it very clear to your reader of what you are breaking down into its component parts.

For example, what evidence do you have to support a point of view? Who are the important historical figures or institutions involved? How are these structures organized? How does this relate back to the overall change or continuity observed in the world?

Group with intent : One skill tested on the AP exam is your ability to relate documents to one another—this is called grouping. The idea of grouping is to essentially create a nice mixture of supporting materials to bolster a thesis that addresses the DBQ question being asked. In order to group effectively, create at least three different groupings with two subgroups each. When you group—group to respond to the prompt.

Do not group just to bundle certain documents together.

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The best analogy would be you have a few different colored buckets, and you want to put a label over each bucket. Then you have a variety of different colored balls which each color representing a document, and you want to put these balls into buckets. You can have documents that fall into more than one group, but the big picture tip to remember is to group in response to the prompt.

This is an absolute must. It answers the question of the motive behind the document. S: S represents Speaker or Source. You want to begin by asking yourself who is the source of the document. Think about the background of this source. Where do they come from? What do they do? Are they male or female? What are their respective views on religion or philosophy? How old are they?

Are they wealthy? O: O stands for occasion. You want to ask yourself when the document was said, where was it said, and why it may have been created. A: A represents for audience. Think about who this person wanted to share this document with. What medium was the document originally delivered in?


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Is it delivered through an official document or is it an artistic piece like a painting? P: P stands for purpose. Ask again, why did this person create or say this document? What is the main motive behind the document? S: S is for the subject of the document. This is where you see if you have an understanding of how the subject relates to the question the test is asking you.

Think about if there are other documents or pieces of history that could further support or not support this document source. TONE: Tone poses the question of what the tone of the document is. This relates closely with speaker. Think about how the creator of the document says certain things. Think about the connotations of certain words. Explicitly state your analysis of POV : Your reader is not psychic. He or she cannot simply read your mind and understand exactly why you are rewriting a quotation by a person from a document. If you do, ask yourself questions like where the data is coming from, how the data was collected, who released the data, etc.

Assessing Maps : When you come across maps, look at the corners and center of the map.


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  • Document-Based Questions.
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Think about why the map may be oriented in a certain way. Think about if the title of the map or the legend reveals anything about the culture the map originates from. Think about how the map was created—where did the information for the map come from. Think about who the map was intended for. Assessing Cultural Pieces : If you come across more artistic documents such as literature, songs, editorials, or advertisements, you want to really think about the motive of why the piece of art or creative writing was made and who the document was intended for.

Be careful with blanket statements : Just because a certain point of view is expressed in a document does not mean that POV applies to everyone from that area. When drawing from the documents, you need to explicitly state which author and document you are citing. Do not fall into the trap of thinking just because there are numbers, it means the numbers are foolproof.

AP World History – All past prompts by topic

Be creative with introducing bias : Many students understand that they need to show their understanding that documents can be biased, but they go about it the wrong way. See the difference? This is one way you clearly demonstrate that you spent a few minutes planning your essay in the very beginning. Leave yourself out of it: Do not refer to yourself when writing your DBQ essays! Stay grounded to the documents : All of your core arguments must be supported through the use of the documents. Do not form the majority of your arguments on what you know from class. Use what you learned in class instead to bolster your arguments in relation to the documents presented.

Start essay practice early : At least one month before the AP World History exam date, organize a few essay questions you will work through for the next four weeks before the test. Find a proctor whether that be a parent, peer, or teacher and have them simulate a timed test as you answer the essay.

Familiarize yourself with the time limits : Part of the reason why we suggest practicing essays early is so that you get so good at writing them that you understand exactly how much time you have left when you begin writing your second to last paragraph. Learn the rubric : If you have never looked at an AP World History grading rubric before you enter the test, you are going in blind.

You must know the rubric like the back of your hand so that you can ensure you tackle all the points the grader is looking for. Here are the Scoring Guidelines. Read the historical background : You know that little blurb at the beginning of the document? The historical background is like a freebie—it can tell you the time period of the document and shed a little insight into the POV of the source. Read it! Familiarize yourself with analyses of art : This one is optional, but a great way to really get used to analyzing art is to visit an art museum and to listen to the way that art is described.

Identify key patterns : You know that saying, history repeats itself?

AP World History Exam Guide | The Princeton Review

This is especially true with AP World History. Comparing the Aztecs and Incas. DBQ Aztec and Inca. Africa COT.

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Europe COT. Global Tapestry Comparisons. Silk Routes Causation. The Mongols DBQ. Comparing the Mongols. DBQ Black Death. DBQ Why Europe. Post Classical Review DBQ Columbian Exchange.

Demographic and env columbian exchange. Americas COT Comparing North and Latin America Western Europe COT Russia DBQ varying attitude toward foreigners.

AP World LEQ Practice Discussion

DBQ Global Absolutism.