Parental involvement in school thesis

Whereas in the past, informal education used to traditionally have parents take full of most responsibility upon parents, today parents feel that they are less responsible. This creates a gap between all stakeholders on what is expected to be obtained from what education is supposed to offer. It had three elements of providing parents with information, giving parents a voice and encouraging parental partnerships with schools.


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In India, Streekanth points it out that the recent endeavor to government to universalize education at the elementary and secondary level in which parents, educated, semi-literate and literate are all part of this movement to bring about silent revolution of educating their children as a means for improving their academic performance standards.

Such incentive programs are an initiation of the government, civil society, the politicians and the community.

Dissertation/Thesis Abstract

Studies done in Africa indicate that the situation is not quite different from the rest of the world, for instance policies are developed in order to increase involvement of parents at national, regional and local levels Bray, ; Suzuki, In Kenya for instance, there is wide legislation that obliges for parent involvement in the school to support teaching and learning like provision of instructional materials, food, clothes and also be active members on selected committee of the school.

It also streamlines aspects of participation through School Management Committees and Parent Teacher Associations where important policies are made for the welfare of both staff and learners. All the mentioned efforts as indicated in different country contexts show that parent involvement is valued do to importance in partnering with the schools for the good of children in formal education. It is this foundation which is upheld through parent partnership with school in formal education of their children through the different mechanisms of participation.

They have a feeling that provision of free education relieves them of the very many responsibilities they are supposed to do; of course which is a misconception. According to Nishimura et al , this has particularly made parents to be sleeping partners in every kind of school participation in school activities and entire education process.

Inspite of free education granted by government it is prudent to note that a parent still as a big role to play if the education process is to achieve the desired output.

Parental Involvement

This involvement and provision of necessities as well as participating in school activities, cover a whole range of direct contributions such as those that this study intended to examine further- attending meetings, helping children on homework, provision of scholastic materials and mid-day meals respectively in Kihorezo parish of Rukiiga district.

Despite the governments effort to provide education for all most stakeholders still lag behind as far as participation in the school system is concerned. In Uganda, Universal Primary Education UPE policy gives guidelines spells out the basic roles of parents is to provide basic needs for their children such as food, education, clothing and instructional materials. On a bad note, It has been observed that several parents of Kihorezo parish are willing to actively get involved in participation and involvement in providing quality education to their children.

Sometimes parents are invited into their meeting with the teachers but the turn up is always so worrying, according to one of the school head teacher. Research done in the developed countries suggests that parental involvement is associated with youth academic success, and estimated that little is known about this relationship in the developing communities.

It is further, not clear which type of parental involvement is significant in this case that may impact the academic performance of children from developing countries. This study examines important areas that include:. Results suggest that parental involvement is a dimensional construct consists of home and school involvement. The effect of parental involvement on children academic performance appears to be a function of the type of involvement.

Home-based parental involvement is associated positively with academic performance, while school-based parental involvement has a negative association. It is important for parents to model positive attitudes and behaviors toward school and convey the importance of school. Social cognitive theory suggests that youth absorb messages about appropriate behavior and socially accepted goals by observing and talking with important people in their lives Bandura, Therefore children are more likely to have a motivational effect and perform better in school when their parents show an interest in their school activity, are willing to assist them while doing homework, and are willing to hold their children accountable for accomplishment of school assignments.

Children who are not hard working at school usually perceive school as valuable when parents actively demonstrate their role in school through involvement as reflected in different tasks.

Literature available on the overall impact of parental involvement and participation and children academic performance in developing countries is minimal. Would be used to determine whether the relationship exists and which type of parental involvement has effects are important to determine in Uganda, where parents often do not have the education to engage their children in schoolwork or the resources to hire tutors.

Does involvement in parent-teacher association meetings, volunteering at school, talking to their children about the importance of school matter? This study will begin to answer these questions and contribute to the literature on the relationship between parental involvement and academic performance in Uganda and the developing world at large. It is important to note that all measures of parental involvement used in studies in developing countries are based on scales that have been established in the context of developed countries.

Therefore parental involvement may be different in developed countries compared to developing countries. These differences may include; types and level of involvement as well as taking into account particular parameters when measuring parental involvement in developing countries. Therefore, this paper focuses on the construct validity of parental involvement in a sample of Uganda youth and their parents.

Research on parental involvement and academic outcomes in the US suggests that parental involvement is best understood as taking multiple forms. At a minimum, parental involvement appears to differ based on the context i. Research also shows that parental involvement at home and in school is linked positively to a variety of academic outcomes Jeynes, , In addition to influencing educational outcomes directly, parental involvement also might mediate the relationship between socioeconomic status SES and academic performance Altschul, ; Lareau, While these relationships have been demonstrated in the US and other developed countries, It may take a different dimension in developing countries.

Therefore, the researcher used the validated measurement of a parental involvement scale to examine the relationship in Uganda. This study contributes to the literature by testing an adaptation of a parental involvement scale that considers the differences in parental involvement in developed countries versus developing countries. It also investigates the relationship between at-home and in-school parental involvement and academic performance. The study addresses that issue by exploring the following research objectives:.

Many Scholars indicate that school teaching and parental role complimentarily and this can be easily enhanced when parents have open an opportunity to participate together in meetings through parent teachers associations through where parents will be able to visit classrooms and interact with their children and teachers Burke, ; Erlendsdottir, ; Kim ; Whittenberger; These studies cover a global context including developing countries like Namibia. According to Whittenberger this improves children engagement.

The Role Of Parental Involvement On Education Essay

Sometimes parents are invited into their meeting with the teachers but the turn up is always so worrying, according to one of the school head teacher. Research done in the developed countries suggests that parental involvement is associated with youth academic success, and estimated that little is known about this relationship in the developing communities.

It is further, not clear which type of parental involvement is significant in this case that may impact the academic performance of children from developing countries. This study examines important areas that include:.

Thesis statement on parental involvement in the classroom - Appraisal

Results suggest that parental involvement is a dimensional construct consists of home and school involvement. The effect of parental involvement on children academic performance appears to be a function of the type of involvement. Home-based parental involvement is associated positively with academic performance, while school-based parental involvement has a negative association. It is important for parents to model positive attitudes and behaviors toward school and convey the importance of school.

Social cognitive theory suggests that youth absorb messages about appropriate behavior and socially accepted goals by observing and talking with important people in their lives Bandura, Therefore children are more likely to have a motivational effect and perform better in school when their parents show an interest in their school activity, are willing to assist them while doing homework, and are willing to hold their children accountable for accomplishment of school assignments. Children who are not hard working at school usually perceive school as valuable when parents actively demonstrate their role in school through involvement as reflected in different tasks.

Literature available on the overall impact of parental involvement and participation and children academic performance in developing countries is minimal. Would be used to determine whether the relationship exists and which type of parental involvement has effects are important to determine in Uganda, where parents often do not have the education to engage their children in schoolwork or the resources to hire tutors.


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Does involvement in parent-teacher association meetings, volunteering at school, talking to their children about the importance of school matter? This study will begin to answer these questions and contribute to the literature on the relationship between parental involvement and academic performance in Uganda and the developing world at large. It is important to note that all measures of parental involvement used in studies in developing countries are based on scales that have been established in the context of developed countries.

Therefore parental involvement may be different in developed countries compared to developing countries. These differences may include; types and level of involvement as well as taking into account particular parameters when measuring parental involvement in developing countries. Therefore, this paper focuses on the construct validity of parental involvement in a sample of Uganda youth and their parents. Research on parental involvement and academic outcomes in the US suggests that parental involvement is best understood as taking multiple forms. At a minimum, parental involvement appears to differ based on the context i.

Research also shows that parental involvement at home and in school is linked positively to a variety of academic outcomes Jeynes, , In addition to influencing educational outcomes directly, parental involvement also might mediate the relationship between socioeconomic status SES and academic performance Altschul, ; Lareau, While these relationships have been demonstrated in the US and other developed countries, It may take a different dimension in developing countries.

Therefore, the researcher used the validated measurement of a parental involvement scale to examine the relationship in Uganda. This study contributes to the literature by testing an adaptation of a parental involvement scale that considers the differences in parental involvement in developed countries versus developing countries. It also investigates the relationship between at-home and in-school parental involvement and academic performance. The study addresses that issue by exploring the following research objectives:. Many Scholars indicate that school teaching and parental role complimentarily and this can be easily enhanced when parents have open an opportunity to participate together in meetings through parent teachers associations through where parents will be able to visit classrooms and interact with their children and teachers Burke, ; Erlendsdottir, ; Kim ; Whittenberger; These studies cover a global context including developing countries like Namibia.

According to Whittenberger this improves children engagement. However there is need to examine further the direct impact of parent presence in a classroom for effective teaching and learning to take place. Meetings are a platform for the parents and teachers to decide on how children should learn. This is particularly important for parents in Uganda where Universal Primary Education has been implemented followed by their withdraw to participate in decision making.

And instead parents are expected to decide on how their children should learn as well as taking a stand to support their own children for effective learning to take place for example providing meals and scholastic materials. Constitutionally every child has a right to basic education and basic necessities but all this seems to be on paper and it all lacks policy consistency. Therefore a Ugandan child is therefore not protected by law since even those who go to school, some learn with no expectation of midday meals. Nishimura in a comparative analysis of Universal Primary Education UPE in Ghana, Malawi, and Uganda indicated that parents claimed to contribute to school by attending meetings.

Table of Contents

Although local government officials like District Officials contradicted their responses, it is very clear that these parents believe that attending meetings is important for the educational process of their children. The study portrayed a clear picture of African experience including Uganda, in which the current study was undertaken but it did not point out why such parents knew the importance of parents meetings but reluctant to regularly attend meetings.

One would need to know whether meetings actually take place, whether parents are properly invited and in time and also whether there exists proper motivational to encourage their attendance of meetings. It is crucial for parents to know the factors behind the learning environment such as where their children learn from, who handles their children, the relationship between the learners and the teachers, the people they interact with outside home and how they behave while at school.

The Impact of Parent Participation and Involvement in Pupils Academic Performance

It is from that that the academic bit of their existence is explored and enhanced as well. This as many scholars indicate, enables parents to participate, evaluate and follow up their children to find out how their children are academically progressing. For instance Ondieki , in her study done in Kenya argues that parents who maintain frequent contact with schools have higher achieving children than parents with no frequent contact. She goes on to argue that schools that are well-connected with the community tend to have higher achieving students than schools with fewer ties.

The issue of better academic performance is a collective responsibility so that both parents and teachers need to participate together, schools should also put in means and ways of to encouraging them to participate. This forms the core of this book.